ORIGINAL PAPER
A note on the effect of caprylic acid and triacylglycerols of caprylic and capric acid on growth rate and shedding of coccidia oocysts in weaned piglets
M. Marounek 1, 2  
,   E. Skřivanová 2, 3,   V. Skřivanová 2
 
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1
Institute of Animal Physiology and Genetics, Czech Academy of Sciences, CZ-142 20 Praha 4, Czech Republic
2
Research Institute of Animal Production, Uhříněves, CZ-104 01 Praha 10, Czech Republic
3
Department of Nutrition, Dietetics, Zoohygiene and Plant Products, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, CZ-612 42 Brno, Czech Republic
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
M. Marounek   

Institute of Animal Physiology and Genetics, Czech Academy of Sciences, CZ-142 20 Praha 4, Czech Republic; Research Institute of Animal Production, Uhříněves, CZ-104 01 Praha 10, Czech Republic
Publication date: 2004-04-09
 
J. Anim. Feed Sci. 2004;13(2):269–274
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) are efficient antimicrobial compounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caprylic acid (C8:0), and an oil containing triacylglycerols of caprylic and capric acid (C10:0), on growth rate of piglets and shedding of coccidia oocysts. Piglets, weaned at 28-32 days of age, were fed a basal diet (Group 1), the same diet supplemented with caprylic acid at 5 g/kg (Group 2), or supplemented with the MCFA-containing oil at 10 g/kg (Group 3). The experiment was carried out on a commercial farm and lasted for 3 weeks. In the course of this period piglets of groups 1, 2 and 3 gained on average 3.64, 4.98 and 3.95 kg, respectively. The effect of caprylic acid on weight gains was statistically significant (P<0.05). Almost all piglets were infected with Cryptosporidium parvum and some of them also with Isospora suis. In treated piglets, shedding of cryptosporidial oocysts was one week delayed and the patent period was shorter. This suggests that a certain coccidiostatic effect of MCFA exists.
 
CITATIONS (7):
1.
Susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens to C2-C18 fatty acids
E. Skrivanova, M. Marounek, G. Dlouha, J. Kanka
Letters in Applied Microbiology
 
2.
Scuticociliatosis and its recent prophylactic measures in aquaculture with special reference to South Korea
Ramasamy Harikrishnan, Chellam Balasundaram, Moon-Soo Heo
Fish & Shellfish Immunology
 
3.
A note on the effect of triacylglycerols of caprylic and capric fatty acid on performance, mortality, and digestibility of nutrients in young rabbits
V. Skřivanová, M. Marounek
Animal Feed Science and Technology
 
4.
Effect of dietary supplemental medium chain fatty acids instead of antibiotics on the growth performance, digestibility and blood profiles in growing pigs
Jian Zhang, Dong Baek, In Kim
Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition
 
5.
Biological Network Approach for the Identification of Regulatory Long Non-Coding RNAs Associated With Metabolic Efficiency in Cattle
Wietje Nolte, Rosemarie Weikard, Ronald Brunner, Elke Albrecht, Harald Hammon, Antonio Reverter, Christa Kühn
Frontiers in Genetics
 
6.
Medium-chain fatty acids and monoglycerides as feed additives for pig production: towards gut health improvement and feed pathogen mitigation
Joshua Jackman, R. Boyd, Charles Elrod
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
 
7.
Dietary Supplementation of Inorganic, Organic, and Fatty Acids in Pig: A Review
Giulia Ferronato, Aldo Prandini
Animals
 
ISSN:1230-1388