ORIGINAL PAPER
The effect of feeding regular or low α-linolenic acid linseed on the fatty acid composition of egg yolks
E. Sosin 1  
,   F. Borowiec 2,   J. Strzetelski 1,   S. Smulikowska 3
 
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1
National Research Institute of Animal Production, Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, 32-083 Balice, Poland
2
Agricultural University of Cracow, Department of Animal Nutrition, Al. Mickiewicza 24/28, Kraków, Poland
3
The Kielanowski Institute of Animal Physiology and Nutrition, Polish Academy of Sciences, 05-110 Jabłonna, Poland
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
E. Sosin   

National Research Institute of Animal Production, Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, 32-083 Balice, Poland
Publication date: 2006-11-06
 
J. Anim. Feed Sci. 2006;15(4):641–650
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Ninety Isa Brown laying hens aged 28 weeks, kept in individual cages, were randomly divided into 6 groups of 15 birds each. Six isoproteinous diets differing in crude fat content and fatty acid (FA) composition were prepared. The source of added fat was linseeds (50 g/kg diet), regular cultivars (Omega and Opal) with a high content of α-linolenic acid (HA), or a modified cultivar (Linola) with low α-linolenic acid- and high linoleic acid (LA) contents, soyabean oil, or LA linseed oil (20 g/kg diet). The control diet, with no fat supplement, contained 19 g, while the experimental diets, 38 g of crude fat per kg. The diets were fed for a 12-week and eggs were collected for chemical analysis at weekly intervals. The dietary fat level had no effect on the fat level in egg yolks. Eggs from hens fed diets with HA linseeds contained 3 times more α-linolenic acid, 2.5 times more EPA (C20:5n-3) and DHA (C22:6n-3) and 27% less arachidonic acid (C20:4n-6) than control eggs (P<0.01). Those from hens fed with LA linseed, LA oil or soyabean oil, had similar levels of linoleic acid, EPA and DHA as control eggs and 14% more arachidonic acid. The ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFA was 3:1 in eggs from hens provided with HA linseed, while in the other groups it ranged from 9:1 to 14:1. In contrast to regular linseed, the use of linseed low in α-linolenic acid and rich in linoleic acid in hen diets is not beneficial for the functional value of eggs.
 
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ISSN:1230-1388