ORIGINAL PAPER
Effect of fertilization and variety on digestibility of phosphorus from plant feedstuffs in pigs
 
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1
University of Bonn, Department of Animal Nutrition, Endenicher Allee 15, D-53115 Bonn, Germany
2
University of Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Nutritional Sciences, D-06099 Halle, Germany
Publication date: 2003-01-02
 
J. Anim. Feed Sci. 2003;12(1):83–93
 
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ABSTRACT
Three experiments were performed to determine the digestibility of phosphorus in plant feedstuffs for pigs. Pigs initially weighing 11 kg were kept in metabolism crates and fed twice daily at about 2 to 2.5-fold metabolizable energy requirement for maintenance. A semi-purified diet low in phosphorus and without intrinsic phytase activity was fed either alone or after blending into test diets containing 60% of barley or wheat or 40% of field bean or rye. Mixtures were calculated to contain not more than 2 g digestible P/kg DM and between 5.0 to 6.0 g Ca/kg DM. Faeces and urine were quantitatively collected for 7 days after 7 days of adaptation. Phosphorus digestibility for ingredients under test was calculated from differences of results on test and basal diet. Digestibility of phosphorus in three different batches of rye was 70% on average. In two batches of field bean the digestibility coefficient was 36%. Phosphorus digestibility in 12 batches of wheat ranged from 43 to 59%, with a mean of 56%, in six batches of barley the digestibility coefficient ranged from 42 to 52% with a mean of 46%. There was no effect of fertilization with nitrogen or phosphorus on the digestibility of phosphorus in wheat, rye or barley. A variety effect on digestibility was indicated for barley and wheat. No clear relation was found between P digestibility on the one hand and portion of phytate-bound P or activity of intrinsic phytase activity on the other hand.
 
CITATIONS (2):
1.
Phytate destruction - consequences for precision animal nutrition
M. Rodehutscord, P. Rosenfelder
 
2.
Phosphorus digestibility and metabolisable energy concentrations of contemporary wheat, barley, rye and triticale genotypes fed to growing pigs
Ralph Schemmer, Claudia Spillner, Karl-Heinz Südekum
Archives of Animal Nutrition
 
ISSN:1230-1388