ORIGINAL PAPER
Effect of beef from grass or maize silage- and concentrate-fed cattle on lipid metabolism and antioxidative status of rats
A. Łozicki 1  
,   M. Dymnicka 1
 
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Warsaw University of Life Sciences, SGGW, Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Management, Ciszewskiego 8, 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
A. Łozicki   

Warsaw University of Life Sciences, SGGW, Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Management, Ciszewskiego 8, 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
Publication date: 2014-06-10
 
J. Anim. Feed Sci. 2014;23(1):45–51
 
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ABSTRACT
In comparison with concentrate-fed animals, grass-fed cattle provides meat with a higher level of desired polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids and compounds with antioxidative effects, e.g., α-tocopherol and β-carotene. This should be reflected in a positive influence on fat metabolism and antioxidative status of the consumer’s organism. There are no studies, however, where the effect of beef obtained from a specified fattening system on lipid metabolism and antioxidative status of the consumer has been analysed. The objective of this study was to compare the influence of beef obtained from grass-fed bulls and from silage/concentrate-fed animals on the lipid metabolism and antioxidant status of rats. In a study conducted for 6 weeks, the rats received AIN93G-based diets containing lyophilized beef from animals fattened intensively with maize silage and concentrates (group S/C-B) or fed extensively with grass (group G-B). The meat constituted 20% of diet and was the only source of protein and fat. The rats from the control group received a meatless AIN-93based diet (CO) with casein and rapeseed oil. The lowest concentrations of triglycerides (TAG), total cholesterol and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) were found in the control group receiving vegetable oil. No effect of kind of meat on the selected parameters of lipid metabolism was recorded. Determination of indicators of antioxidative status revealed that the highest concentration of glutathione peroxidase was found in the serum of rats from group G-B. The livers of the animals from this group also had the highest concentration of α-tocopherol and the lowest of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). In summary, we can state that the meat from the grass-fed animals, as compared with that from intensively fattened bulls, positively affected most of the examined antioxidative status indicators in rats. No effect of the meat on indicators of lipid metabolism was found.
ISSN:1230-1388