0.857
IF5
0.900
IF
Q3
JCR
0.92
CiteScore
0.405
SJR
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SJR
20
MNiSW
165.24
ICV
ORIGINAL PAPER
 
CC-BY 4.0
 
 

Effect of increasing doses of marigold (Tagetes erecta) flower extract on eggs carotenoids content, colour and oxidative stability

M. Skřivan 1  ,  
M. Marounek 1,  
 
1
Institute of Animal Science, Department of Nutrition Physiology and Animal Product Quality, Přátelství 815, CZ-104 00, Prague, Czech Republic
2
Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Department of Microbiology, Nutrition and Dietetics, Kamýcká 129, CZ-165 21, Prague, Czech Republic
J. Anim. Feed Sci. 2016;25(1):58–64
Publish date: 2016-03-09
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Two hundred and forty hens were assigned to six dietary treatments and fed a maize-wheat-soyabean diet supplemented per kg with 0, 150, 350, 550, 750 and 950 mg of marigold flower extract (MFE) containing lutein and zeaxanthin in the amount of 21.26 and 9.65 mg · kg–1, respectively. There was observed no MFE addition effect on hens body weight and feed conversion ratio. The higher hen-day egg production was stated for group fed diet supplemented with 550 and 950 mg of MFE per kg of diet, whereas egg weight was increased in groups fed 550 and 750 mg MFE per kg of diet. The treatment effects on the albumen parameters, and yolk and shell percentages were not statistically significant. Dietary MFE addition increased the yolk colour score (DSM Yolk Colour Fan), and redness and yellowness of the yolks but decreased their lightness. Supplementation of MFE increased the lutein and zeaxanthin concentration in the egg yolks in a dose-dependent manner, from 12.34 and 5.92 mg · kg–1 dry matter (control) to 36.33 and 25.59 mg · kg–1 dry matter (group fed diet with 950 mg MFE per kg), respectively. No treatment effect on the concentrations of retinol and α-tocopherol in the yolk was observed. Dietary MFE significantly increased the oxidative stability of eggs lipids stored at 18 °C for 28 days. It can be concluded that 1. hen diet supplementation with MFE provides the yolk pigmentation required by consumers, and 2. MFE (in the amount of 550 mg · kg–1 diet) is a suitable alternative to commercial synthetic xanthophylls.
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
M. Skřivan   
Institute of Animal Science, Department of Nutrition Physiology and Animal Product Quality, Přátelství 815, CZ-104 00, Prague, Czech Republic
 
CITATIONS (1):
1. The potential of cholecalciferol and 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 enriched diets in laying hens, to improve egg vitamin D content and antioxidant availability
Sarah K. Duffy, Gaurav Rajauria, Louise C. Clarke, Alan K. Kelly, Kevin D. Cashman, John V. O'Doherty
Innovative Food Science & Emerging Technologies
ISSN:1230-1388