1.054
IF5
1.150
IF
Q3
JCR
1.7
CiteScore
0.396
SJR
Q2
SJR
40
MNiSW
148.75
ICV
ORIGINAL PAPER
 
CC-BY-NC 4.0
 
 

Effects of rumen-protected choline supplied at different dietary energy levels on growth performance and meat quality of fattening goats

Y.L. Tu 1,  
Y.F. Bai 1  ,  
K. Zhang 2,  
L.P. Gao 2,  
 
1
Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Animal Science, Nanjing 210014, Jiangsu, China
2
Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences
3
Shanghai menon animal nutrition technology co.,LTD
J. Anim. Feed Sci. 2020;29(3):234–240
Publication date: 2020-09-30
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
The effects of rumen-protected choline (RPC) supplementation in different energy level diets on growth performance and meat quality of fattening goats were examined in this study. A total of 40 six-month-old Cashmere goats, with an initial live body weight of 24.30  2.64 kg, were randomly assigned to four treatments consisting of feeds with two different digestible energy (DE) levels (11.94 and 10.89 MJ/kg) and RPC supplement levels (0% and 0.2%). The experiment continued for 70 days in total, with the first 10 days for acclimation and the following 60 days as the formal experimental period. The results showed that RPC supplementation in a low energy diet improved the overall average daily feed intake, and the interaction effect of RPC×DE was highly significant between days 20 to 60 of the experiment. The overall average daily gain and feed to gain indices were not significantly affected by RPC supplementation at any energy level; however, RPC supplementation in a low energy diet tended to improve these indices. There were no significant effects of RPC×DE on slaughter performance, meat quality, or serum biochemical indices; however, RPC supplementation resulted in lower drip loss, cook loss, and shearing force, with a tendency to improve meat quality. Another positive effect of RPC supplementation was the enhancement of serum albumin and the reduction of serum urea nitrogen levels. These results suggest that RPC has a greater effect on growth performance when supplemented in low energy diets, and RPC addition can improve meat quality.
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Y.F. Bai   
Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Animal Science, Nanjing 210014, Jiangsu, China
 
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ISSN:1230-1388