ORIGINAL PAPER
Effects of phytogenic products on in vitro rumen fermentation and methane emission in goats
G. Z. Dong 1  
,   X. J. Wang 1,   Z. B. Liu 1,   F. Wang 1
 
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College of Animal Science and Technology, Southwest University Key Laboratory of Grass and Herbivores of Chongqing, Beibei, Chongqing, 400716, P.R. China
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
G. Z. Dong   

College of Animal Science and Technology, Southwest University Key Laboratory of Grass and Herbivores of Chongqing, Beibei, Chongqing, 400716, P.R. China
Publication date: 2010-05-06
 
J. Anim. Feed Sci. 2010;19(2):218–229
 
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ABSTRACT
This study evaluated the effects of addition of lucerne extract (LE), Artemisiae annuae extract (AAE), and mixed herbal medicine (MHM) into different goat diets on in vitro rumen fermentation and methane production. In addition to the negative control (NC), addition of monensin (MO) served as the positive control (PC). Four ruminally cannulated Nanjiang Yellow goats (45 ± 2 kg liveweight) were used as donors of ruminal fluid. The results showed: 1. compared with NC, addition of all the additives into the mixed grass diet increased propionate concentration (P<0.05). Protozoa numbers and methane production were reduced by addition of all the additives (P<0.05); 2. compared with NC, LE and AAE in the lucerne diet increased propionate concentration (P<0.05). All the additives reduced protozoa numbers (P<0.05). Methane production was decreased by addition of LE compared with NC and PC (P<0.05); 3. addition of LE into the mixed grass-concentrate diet resulted in an increase of the propionate concentration compared with NC and PC (P<0.05). Protozoa numbers were reduced by addition of LE and AAE compared with NC (P<0.05). Methane production was decreased by addition of AAE compared with NC and PC (P<0.05); 4. compared with NC, addition of AAE and MHM into the lucerne-concentrate diet resulted in an increase of propionate concentration (P<0.05). Protozoa numbers were reduced by addition of all the additives (P<0.05). Methane production was decreased by addition of AAE and MHM (P<0.05). In conclusion, addition of LE, AAE and MHM into different diets reduced methane production, increased propionate concentration and decreased protozoa numbers to a certain extent, and the inhibitory effects of the phytogenic products on methane production are more remarkable in the mixed-grass diet. The phytogenic products appear to be promising alternatives to MO in altering in vitro rumen fermentation and reducing methane production in goats.
 
CITATIONS (3):
1.
Dietary inclusion effects of phytochemicals as growth promoters in animal production
Nidia Vanessa Valenzuela-Grijalva, Araceli Pinelli-Saavedra, Adriana Muhlia-Almazan, David Domínguez-Díaz, Humberto González-Ríos
Journal of Animal Science and Technology
 
2.
Climate Change and Goat Production: Enteric Methane Emission and Its Mitigation
Pratap Pragna, Surinder S. Chauhan, Veerasamy Sejian, Brian J. Leury, Frank R. Dunshea
Animals
 
3.
Effect of dry medicinal plants (wormwood, chamomile, fumitory and mallow) on in vitro ruminal antioxidant capacity and fermentation patterns of sheep
Daniel Petrič, Dominika Mravčáková, Katarína Kucková, Klaudia Čobanová, Svetlana Kišidayová, Adam Cieslak, Sylwester Ślusarczyk, Zora Váradyová
Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition
 
ISSN:1230-1388