ORIGINAL PAPER
The effect of genetically modified feeds on productivity, milk composition, serum metabolite profiles and transfer of tDNA into milk of cows
 
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1
National Research Institute of Animal Production, Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, 32-083 Balice, Poland
2
National Research Institute of Animal Production, National Laboratory for Feedingstuffs, Żubrów 1, 71-617 Szczecin, Poland
3
National Veterinary Research Institute, Department of Hygiene of Animal Feedingstuffs, al. Partyzantów 57, 24-100 Puławy, Poland
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
I. Furgał-Dierżuk   

National Research Institute of Animal Production, Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, 32-083 Balice, Poland
Publication date: 2015-03-15
 
J. Anim. Feed Sci. 2015;24(1):19–30
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
The experiment was performed to determine whether transgenic maize containing the Bt gene (MON 810) and soyabean meal produced from glyphosate-tolerant plants (Roundup Ready, MON 40-3-2) compared with nontransgenic plants can affect the performance parameters, milk composition, blood serum metabolite profiles and transfer of tDNA into milk of cows. The experiment was carried out from the third week before parturition to the 305th day of lactation on 40 Polish Holstein-Friesian cows, which were allotted to 4 groups of 10 animals according to body weight, milk yield and parity. The cows in all groups were fed a total mixed ration (TMR) formulated according to IZ-INRA (2009). The concentrate mixtures added to TMR contained: nonmodified (traditional) maize and soyabean meal (group TMG/TS); traditional maize and genetically modified (GM) soyabean meal (group TMG/MS); GM maize and traditional soyabean meal (group MMG/TS); or GM maize and GM soyabean meal (group MMG/MS). There were no significant differences between transgenic and non-transgenic feeds in productivity, milk composition and blood metabolite profiles such as: β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA), free fatty acids (FFA), glucose, insulin and progesterone. The transgenic DNA sequences of MON 810 and RR soyabean meal were not detectable by PCR in milk.
 
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ISSN:1230-1388