ORIGINAL PAPER
Enrichment of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes of plant populations and plateau pikas along altitudes
X. F. Yi 1, 2  
,   Y. Q. Yang 1
 
More details
Hide details
1
College of Agriculture, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang, 471003, P.R. China
2
Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), 59#, Xiguan Street, Xining 810001, Qinghai, P.R. China
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
X. F. Yi   

College of Agriculture, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang, 471003, P.R. China; Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), 59#, Xiguan Street, Xining 810001, Qinghai, P.R. China
Publication date: 2006-11-06
 
J. Anim. Feed Sci. 2006;15(4):661–667
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were measured in plant populations and plateau pikas to determine enrichment in stable isotopes of three alpine meadow ecosystems at different elevations in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. The results indicated that stable carbon isotope signatures of plant populations at the three locations showed significant variations, δ13C of plant populations showed an enrichment of 0.86‰ per 1000 m over the linear proportion of the altitudinal response, while stable nitrogen isotopes showed no apparent difference. The stable nitrogen isotopes of plateau pikas became significantly isotopically heavier along altitudinal gradients and showed an enrichment of 3.17‰/km. Stable carbon isotopes showed no significance, however, and the enrichment of 0.448‰/km. δ 13C and δ 15N in plateau pikas were not significantly correlated. There appeared to be segregation between the metabolism of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes of plateau pikas. Variances in metabolic rate at lower water availability and temperatures are presumed to be the main cause of enrichment of stable nitrogen isotopes along altitudinal gradients. Attention should be paid to construct trophic positions and to trace food chain information based on an isotopic enrichment model.
 
CITATIONS (8):
1.
Physiological, elemental, and stable isotope responses of the organs of mungbean to reduced atmospheric pressure
Yan Zhao, Bin Guo, Kehong Liang, Donghua Wang, Shuming Yang
In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology - Plant
 
2.
Stable Nitrogen and Carbon Isotopes May Not Be Good Indicators of Altitudinal Distributions of Montane Passerines
Yuan-Mou Chang, Kent A. Hatch, Hsin-Lin Wei, Hsiao-Wei Yuan, Cheng-Feng You, Dennis Eggett, Yi-Hsuan Tu, Ya-Ling Lin, Hau-Jie Shiu
The Wilson Journal of Ornithology
 
3.
Nitrogen isotope composition characteristics of modern plants and their variations along an altitudinal gradient in Dongling Mountain in Beijing
XianZhao Liu, GuoAn Wang, JiaZhu Li, Qing Wang
Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences
 
4.
Measurements of nitrogen isotope composition of plants and surface soils along the altitudinal transect of the eastern slope of Mount Gongga in southwest China
Xian-zhao Liu, Guoan Wang
Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry
 
5.
The effect of metabolic rate on stable carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions in deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus
J. J. Smith, J. S. Millar, F. J. Longstaffe, R. Boonstra
Canadian Journal of Zoology
 
6.
Leaf and Soil δ15N Patterns Along Elevational Gradients at Both Treelines and Shrublines in Three Different Climate Zones
Xue Wang, Yong Jiang, Haiyan Ren, Fei-Hai Yu, Mai-He Li
Forests
 
7.
Isotopic niche of the American pika (Ochotona princeps) through space and time
M.L. Westover, K.A. Lizewski, K.B. Klingler, F.A. Smith
Canadian Journal of Zoology
 
8.
Spatial patterns of leaf δ 13 C and δ 15 N of aquatic macrophytes in the arid zone of northwestern China
Xusheng Gong, Zhiyan Xu, Qiutong Peng, Yuqing Tian, Yang Hu, Zhongqiang Li, Tao Hao
Ecology and Evolution
 
ISSN:1230-1388