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ORIGINAL PAPER
 
CC-BY 4.0
 
 

Effects of dietary methionine levels and L-carnitine supplementation on performance and egg quality parameters of layers

M. Daşkıran 1,  
A. G. Önol 2,  
Ö. Cengiz 2  ,  
O. Tatlı 2,  
 
1
Johnson & Johnson Corporate Science and Technology, 410 George Street, New Brunswick, 08901, NJ, USA
2
Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Animal Nutrition and Nutritional Diseases, 09016 Aydın, Turkey
J. Anim. Feed Sci. 2009;18(4):650–661
Publish date: 2009-11-06
KEYWORDS:
ABSTRACT:
Effects of dietary carnitine supplementation (0 and 150 mg/kg L-carnitine) on performance and egg quality parameters of layers in late laying period (from 62 to 72 weeks) fed maize-soyabean meal based diets with different methionine levels (0.26 vs 0.40%) were investigated. A RCBD with 2×2 factorial arrangement was applied. Eight replicates of the four dietary treatments (3 layers in each cage, a total of 32 cages) were randomly distributed into blocks. The study period was 10 weeks and ninety six 62-week-old Nick Chick white layers were used. In the study, dietary carnitine supplementation did not affect egg production, feed consumption and feed efficiency. However, dietary methionine below requirement level either numerically (the first 5 week from 62 to 67th weeks and overall 10-week period) or statistically (P<0.05) (last 5 week from 67 to 72th weeks) reduced egg production and feed efficiency. Similar to performance data, dietary carnitine supplementation had no impact on egg, egg yolk, and egg shell weights, however, the reduction in dietary methionine level had negative impacts on these parameters as early as 4th week of the study. Neither carnitine nor methionine improved corrected yolk and egg shell weight, yolk colour and egg shell thickness, however, both egg shape index and Haugh unit were affected by dietary methionine levels (P<0.05). In summary, carnitine supplementation did not affect layer performance and egg quality whereas dietary methionine deficiency significantly reduced layer performance and egg quality in late laying period and the effect was more visible towards the end of the study.
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR:
Ö. Cengiz   
Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Animal Nutrition and Nutritional Diseases, 09016 Aydın, Turkey
 
CITATIONS (5):
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Z. REHMAN, S. NAZ, R.U. KHAN, M. TAHIR
World's Poultry Science Journal
2. Effect of methionine supplementation on mitochondrial genes expression in the breast muscle and liver of broilers
Ana Paula Del Vesco, Eliane Gasparino, Adhemar Rodrigues Oliveira Neto, Robson Marcelo Rossi, Maria Amélia Menck Soares, Stefânia Caroline Claudino da Silva
Livestock Science
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SH. GOLZAR ADABI, R.G. COOPER, N. CEYLAN, M. CORDUK
World's Poultry Science Journal
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P. Murali, S. K. George, K. Ally, M. T. Dipu
Veterinary World
5. Basic mechanisms of the regulation of L-carnitine status in monogastrics and efficacy of L-carnitine as a feed additive in pigs and poultry
Robert Ringseis, Janine Keller, Klaus Eder
Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition
ISSN:1230-1388